HoC question about Cornish Geothermal Technology: but no mention of EU Funding


During a Energy and Climate Change debate (14/7/2016) Cornwall MP Steve Double, raised the issue of deep geothermal as a source of renewable energy to the newly appointed Minister of State for Enviornment, Andrea Leadsom.

geothermal-cornwall

Eden Deep Geothermal Energy Project (Image: Eden Project)

 

As both these MP’s are in the pro-Brexit camp, its unsurprising that EU funding, being a factor towards Cornwall’s geothermal future , is notably missing from the debate:

Steve Double:
“What assessment she has made of the potential contribution of deep geothermal as a source of renewable energy.”

Andrea Leadsom:
“Owing to our geology, deep geothermal power is likely to make a small contribution to electricity supply. However, Cornwall is one area where the technology can work and I am pleased that this is part of the devolution deal for Cornwall. Deep geothermal heat has greater potential and we are supporting its development through the renewable heat incentive and through feasibility studies funded by the heat network delivery unit.”

Steve Double:
“I thank the Minister for that response. Deep geothermal has the great benefit of being a baseload energy source that is not reliant on variable weather conditions, and, as the Minister points out, Cornwall is one place where great potential for geothermal lies. As she is aware, a scheme is being developed at the Eden project in my constituency. May I invite her to visit Cornwall to see for herself the huge potential that there is for geothermal development there?”

Andrea Leadsom:
“I am grateful to my hon. Friend; nothing would please me more than a nice holiday in Cornwall right now. I am very pleased to hear that the EGS Energy and Eden project development is progressing well and, as he knows, it has the potential to produce power for about 4,000 homes and to make a very important contribution to the local community.”

Mr Double has assured the people of Cornwall that EU funding will continue at least until ‘the legal status of the UK’s relationship changes with the EU. He has made a further assurance that “The money we get from the EU is essentially just a small fraction of what we’ve handed over. If we leave the EU, we could utilise that extra £11bn a year in a number of important sectors.”

So can those in Cornwall who are in receipt of EU funding, or have applied for EU funding for the future, be assured that when the UK leaves the EU,  Westminster will make up the shortfall?  Not really, as Westminster’s refusal to fund Cornwall adequately was the reason it qualified for the EU funding in the first place.

With the new Prime Minister Theresa May’s decision to abolish the Department for Energy and Climate Change, and the Chancellor Philip Hammond’s Autumn Statement likely to be about public spending and deficit reduction, Cornwall’s geothermal future is not looking good.

 

 

 

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